Let me gouge my eyes out because I’ll never see anything more beautiful. 

Last week ‘living god’ and definitely not an extremely lonely anti-union memelord billionaire unveiled a truck that looks like a child’s attempt at drawing a DeLorean from memoryfailing and then eating the piece of paper out of shame. It fucking rocks.  

This truck has everything I ever wanted in a truck. It has wheels. It’s angular. It can almost withstand the impact of a metal ball. It has wheels (I repeat that because it definitely does have wheels and it bears repeating). It doesn’t have side mirrors because fuck side mirrors am I right? It’s also got an interior I guess which I imagine is cool. To put it simply, it’s going to revolutionise how we get around, just like those single car tunnels that Musk wants to drill everywhere. Practicality is the name of the game, peasants.  

Personally, I literally cannot wait to drive this metal coffin around town only to struggle parking it (or maybe it parks itself or drives around until you’re done shopping, I don’t know because I hardly did any research for this blog and it shows). I might also put stuff in the back of it cos it’s a truck and that seems like a pretty trucky thing to do. But most of all I’m looking forward to reaching the level douche I’ve always aspired to bag 

I also saw a video of a Cybertruck winning a pulling competition against another (less cybery) truck, so that rocks too (as long as I’m only ever challenged to a truck pulling competitions by people who don’t own a Cybertruck). The glory of that win – knowing that I literally had nothing to do with my own victory – will be exactly like the feeling Elon gets when he accomplishes anything. I don’t know if I’m saying Elon is a talent sponge who uses his vast wealth to stand on the shoulders of smarter people for the sole purpose of promoting the façade of ‘eccentric billionaire inventor’ or maybe I’m saying the complete opposite, you decide.  

Either way buy a Cybertruck you piece of shit.  

Related Content

Keen to read some more?

Game, Set… Mix and Match

Viewers of the French Open were served up something slightly different earlier…

Nissan.com: A true underdog story

Everybody loves an underdog. Whether it’s David (of Bible fame) sling-shotting…

TOFU’s Top 5 – 9 May 2019

TOFU's Top 5 for the week of 5 - 9th May.

I hope my Robotaxi gets me home in time for my Coles Drone delivery

It may sound like the script from a cheap sci-fi flick, but this technology is…

Warehouse 6, 28 Down Street
Collingwood, VIC, 3066

    


novak french open qr code

Game, Set… Mix and Match

“Game, Set… Mix and Match”

Viewers of the French Open were served up something slightly different earlier this month. Those watching NBC’s coverage were encouraged to point their smartphone at the TV and purchase Novak Djokovic’s outfit directly via a pop-up QR code.

This approach sheds light on how marketers might take advantage of ‘double screeners’ moving forward: those of us who will passively sit and watch TV, whilst still scrolling through social media on our phones. Considering the average person checks their phone 47 times per day, a large number of us fall into this category – whether we admit it or not.

A constant challenge for TV advertisers has been motivating viewers to perform any action at all. Whilst Display ads online serve up content and checkouts with a single ad click, it takes a lot more effort for TV viewers to engage with an ad and then manually search for the specific promotion or product. Brand awareness might increase with these campaigns, but spontaneous purchases are far less likely.

Tracking the effectiveness of a TV commercial can also be difficult. Whilst the overall website traffic might spike around the time of the advert broadcast (a great indicator of audience cut through), the TVC or TV sponsorship content can’t always be given credit for the individual purchases. Until now.

NBCU’s approach helps to bridge this vital gap. QR codes can be tracked, user journeys can be analysed, and profits can be attributed to individual channels – all of which make for a far more valuable campaign report – and far more informed future campaigns.

For creative advertisers and innovative programme sponsors, it opens up a whole new way to market products. Watching the AFL Final live from the MCG? How about a Sherrin Footy code to commemorate the game?  Listening to a track during the final of MasterChef? Get that Spotify QR code up on screen and attract a wave of new listeners.

NBCUniversal’s innovation efforts already seem to be paying off. A Shoppable TV test on the Today Show encouraged over 50,000 QR code scans – with the broadcaster taking a pre-arranged cut of each sale.

Related Content

Keen to read some more?

Game, Set… Mix and Match

Viewers of the French Open were served up something slightly different earlier…

Nissan.com: A true underdog story

Everybody loves an underdog. Whether it’s David (of Bible fame) sling-shotting…

TOFU’s Top 5 – 9 May 2019

TOFU's Top 5 for the week of 5 - 9th May.

I hope my Robotaxi gets me home in time for my Coles Drone delivery

It may sound like the script from a cheap sci-fi flick, but this technology is…

Warehouse 6, 28 Down Street
Collingwood, VIC, 3066

    


Nissan.com: A true underdog story

“Nissan.com: A true underdog story”

Everybody loves an underdog. Whether it’s David (of Bible fame) sling-shotting Goliath in 600BC, a Jamaican bobsled team in 1994AD, or the Karate Kid himself, we love to see the little guy stick up for themselves and come out on top.

Giants these days, don’t get too much bigger than Nissan. They sit at #81, on the Forbes’ Most Valuable Brands list, have over 140,000 employees on the payroll and boast a market cap in excess of $31 billion. Not bad going.

So if you happened to be on the hunt for a new set of wheels and typed in Nissan.com, not only would you be disappointed in the lack of Qashqais and Jukes, you’d probably wonder why your browser had been redirected… to the year 1997.

That’s because Nissan.com is still owned by Uzi Nissan; small-business owner and computer salesman with infamous balls of steel… and absolutely no connection to the car manufacturer. Rather than the latest range of automobiles, the website is now a shrine to his lengthy legal battle against the global giant, in all its 90s web design glory.

In addition to the flashing banners and 3D effect hyperlinks, there are also two prominent ‘No Entry’ badges, wrapped in red around the Nissan logo. A not-so-subtle middle finger to the company who tried to sue Uzi for $10 million dollars in damages, claiming trademark infringement, trademark dilution and cyber squatting. Yikes.

Uzi, an Israeli immigrant to America, felt he had worked too hard in establishing his family named business to simply roll over and give in to their demands. So Uzi lawyered up.

Long story short, our 21st century David fought tooth and nail for over half a decade. Nissan used their seemingly endless resources to pursue every possible legal angle. They tried and failed to get the case taken to the Supreme Court, eventually dropping the claim for $10 million in damages fearing a jury would vote against the heavy-handed corporate giant. Finally they changed their request to something more simple: ownership of the Nissan.com URL. Sorry boys, swing and a miss.

Although there were several settlement offers suggested, each one was rejected by Uzi who felt that the legal and personal cost were not fairly covered. Uzi held his ground until the final decision was made in mid 2007, ruling in Uzi’s favour.

It took one hell of a toll on his personal life – would he do it again? Absolutely not. But in an age where money can seemingly get anybody out of a stick situation (Donald Trump, The Panama Papers, FIFA), it’s still a real mood booster to hear about an unlikely victory against our corporate overlords.

Check it out for yourself at Nissan.com.

Related Content

Keen to read some more?

Game, Set… Mix and Match

Viewers of the French Open were served up something slightly different earlier…

Nissan.com: A true underdog story

Everybody loves an underdog. Whether it’s David (of Bible fame) sling-shotting…

TOFU’s Top 5 – 9 May 2019

TOFU's Top 5 for the week of 5 - 9th May.

I hope my Robotaxi gets me home in time for my Coles Drone delivery

It may sound like the script from a cheap sci-fi flick, but this technology is…

Warehouse 6, 28 Down Street
Collingwood, VIC, 3066

    


TOFU's Top 5 - 9 May 2019

TOFU’s Top 5 – 9 May 2019

#1 – Facebook is rolling out its biggest redesign ever. With a focus on groups, events and messenger, Facebook is moving away from the news feed. Read more.

#2 – Would you share a scooter to beat the CBD gridlock? Introducing Scooti, Melbourne’s two-wheeled rival to Uber. Read more.

#3 – IT’S ABOUT BLOODY TIME! YouTube has FINALLY let go of its clunky, frustrating, complicated design for a new clean, binge-friendly alternative. Read more.

#4 – Another strong contender for ending humanity has entered the race – and with good odds! Read more.

#5 – Launch of Chat Bot ‘Hello Cass’. An SMS resource centre that breaks down the barriers of accessibility by seeking help for those who have experienced violence. Read more.

BONUS – You can view the screaming Roomba video here – note – this is definitely NSFW.

Related Content

Keen to read some more?

Game, Set… Mix and Match

Viewers of the French Open were served up something slightly different earlier…

Nissan.com: A true underdog story

Everybody loves an underdog. Whether it’s David (of Bible fame) sling-shotting…

TOFU’s Top 5 – 9 May 2019

TOFU's Top 5 for the week of 5 - 9th May.

I hope my Robotaxi gets me home in time for my Coles Drone delivery

It may sound like the script from a cheap sci-fi flick, but this technology is…

Warehouse 6, 28 Down Street
Collingwood, VIC, 3066

    


I hope my Robotaxi gets me home in time for my Coles Drone delivery

“I hope my Robotaxi gets me home in time for my Coles Drone delivery”

It may sound like the script from a cheap sci-fi flick, but this technology is right on our doorstep. Tech giants Google and Tesla each made huge announcements this week which shed light the kind of lifestyle changes we might expect moving into 2020.

While sales giant Amazon has always been vocal about their drone delivery plans, it’s Google-backed company Wing who are the first to be approved as an airline by the US Federal Aviation Authority. Wing is owned by Google’s parent company Alphabet, who boast a market value of over $230 billion.

This new ‘airline’ status will see the company subject to the same strict regulations as chartered flights, but will allow them to deliver cargo and fly further than other drone companies. They’re set for take-off in rural Virginia within the next few months and will be initially used to carry food and medicine.

The technology has been green-lighted Down Under too, with Australia’s Civil Aviation Safety Authority granting Wing approval to launch a home delivery service.

Not everybody is sold on the ‘buzz’ though. Residents in the test area of Canberra have complained about the noise pollution produced by the fleet of drones…

Tesla’s recent announcement is a little more grounded – focussed on changing the way we travel at street level.

Elon Musk, Chief Executive of electric car company Tesla, has predicted we will have self-driving ‘Robotaxis’ on roads as early as 2020.

The claims come after Musk unveiled new hardware in the form of a microchip that would make ‘full self driving’ possible. As it stands, no Tesla vehicle is at the standard needed to be totally autonomous, though the technology is rapidly improving after clocking up millions of miles in test drives.

The change in tech presents huge legal and social challenges. Musk boasts that one day self-driving cars can be used to make money for their owners while they’re at work. On the flip-side, swathes of transport industry jobs could be made redundant overnight – an impact taxi drivers are already feeling from Uber.

Some of the biggest challenges to be tackled are also in the legal space. No technology is perfect, so who’s accountable when things go wrong on the road? What does that mean for the car insurance industry? And more importantly, if my Robotaxi has an accident and I miss my drone delivery, who’s footing the bill?

Welcome to the rapidly changing future. Folding phone screens are so last week.

Related Content

Keen to read some more?

Game, Set… Mix and Match

Viewers of the French Open were served up something slightly different earlier…

Nissan.com: A true underdog story

Everybody loves an underdog. Whether it’s David (of Bible fame) sling-shotting…

TOFU’s Top 5 – 9 May 2019

TOFU's Top 5 for the week of 5 - 9th May.

I hope my Robotaxi gets me home in time for my Coles Drone delivery

It may sound like the script from a cheap sci-fi flick, but this technology is…

Warehouse 6, 28 Down Street
Collingwood, VIC, 3066